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 Help Needed for 3d tiles 
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Joined: December 3rd, 2015, 11:43 am
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Hello;

A few questions:

So I am trying to mount molded tiles to the Insulation foam, I'm having a hard time, last night tried elmers glue, haven't checked to see if it took, but what do you all recommend, because hot glue does not work.


I am making a boat that players can fight on and move through, and want it to rest on water. When doing water effects on the insulation board, do you recommend I put down a layer of elmers glue first or pva glue to make a nice basin? Or is that not necessary when using insulation board?


lastly, I am making shop stalls for the street market, when adhering fabric to Balsam wood, is Elmers glue fine, or would hot glue work for this? Thanks in advance.

-Drew


May 11th, 2018, 2:53 pm
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I always use wood glue for my tiles. It takes a good 24 hours to dry fully but the bond is then stronger than the foam itself. You want to get a nice even spread of glue, not just a dollop in the middle. I have also used hot glue, but only to plug gaps where I hadn't cut neatly enough or had misjudged an angle or whatever. The glue I have used on every board I've made is by a company called Evo Stik but I'm sure any wood glue will work. The problem with craft pva glue (or "school glue" is that the water content is too high, the glue is too thin to properly adhere.

Whose water effects are you using? I used "Realistic Water" from "Woodland Scenics" in my tiles and that says all over NOT to let it come into contact with PVA glue (even dry) or it will react oddly. I made a basin of plaster for mine which I then painted with acrylic paint, sealed with acrylic varnish, and then added the water effects.

This depends on the angles of what you're doing. If I was doing horizontal surfaces like the carpet in my castle tiles I would happily just spread some wood glue down and maybe put something heavy on to help it sink into the fibres of the fabric. If I was going to do a wall hanging or something though that is going to be on a vertical surface... I might be tempted to "tack" it in place using a blob of hot glue, and then use wood glue as well to secure it fully. The reason for using the hot glue in this case is because it sets so quickly compared to the pva. Remember you can always lightly score surfaces where they meet if you want to give the glue more to grip onto.

Can't wait to see what you are making!


May 11th, 2018, 4:55 pm
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fibretip wrote:
I always use wood glue for my tiles. It takes a good 24 hours to dry fully but the bond is then stronger than the foam itself. You want to get a nice even spread of glue, not just a dollop in the middle. I have also used hot glue, but only to plug gaps where I hadn't cut neatly enough or had misjudged an angle or whatever. The glue I have used on every board I've made is by a company called Evo Stik but I'm sure any wood glue will work. The problem with craft pva glue (or "school glue" is that the water content is too high, the glue is too thin to properly adhere.



Awesome, thanks for the tip. I have it drying right now from overnight and Im going to see how it holds, if it doesn't hold well I will try this, what do you use for foam to foam? Same glue? Thanks.



fibretip wrote:
Whose water effects are you using? I used "Realistic Water" from "Woodland Scenics" in my tiles and that says all over NOT to let it come into contact with PVA glue (even dry) or it will react oddly. I made a basin of plaster for mine which I then painted with acrylic paint, sealed with acrylic varnish, and then added the water effects.



Thanks for the tip, I have the realistic water for Woodland Scenics. I'll make some kind of liner where I am going to use it before putting it on.



fibretip wrote:
This depends on the angles of what you're doing. If I was doing horizontal surfaces like the carpet in my castle tiles I would happily just spread some wood glue down and maybe put something heavy on to help it sink into the fibres of the fabric. If I was going to do a wall hanging or something though that is going to be on a vertical surface... I might be tempted to "tack" it in place using a blob of hot glue, and then use wood glue as well to secure it fully. The reason for using the hot glue in this case is because it sets so quickly compared to the pva. Remember you can always lightly score surfaces where they meet if you want to give the glue more to grip onto.

Can't wait to see what you are making!


This is excellent advice! I appreciate it.




Thank you for all the tips and tricks. And I will post when I can. I am making a narrative dungeon for my version of legends, it should be.....Interesting to say the least.


May 11th, 2018, 5:02 pm
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I use wood glue for everything on the tiles whether it's foam, fabric, card, wood, whatever I'm attaching. The only other adhesive I use is a flexible tile grout in a tube that I use to fill gaps from my lazy knife work around the outside of the tiles.

Making a basin is really important, I didn't realise that the first time round. If you pour it blind onto the foam then bubbles of air get trapped in the foams celular structure. I didn't think much of this at the time (I wasn't very careful to cover every single surface on my first go) but over the years some huge bubbles have gradually worked their way through the water effects stuff.

It is a strange product...It never dries fully hard, you can always mark it with a fingernail. If the weather gets particularly hot it gets grumpy and weird things can happen like bubbles. I once left a game overnight and my son had put a model on the water effects stuff (this was over a year after I made the tiles). When we came down in the morning I went to pick up the model and it was completely stuck... the resulting mark left in the surface of the water when I wrenched the figure off took months to go away. I was expecting it to be hard like resin but it's more like rubber.

The other thing with Realistic Water is... do not think they are being overdramatic when they say thin layers. It really is an exercise in patience. You need to do repeated small layers (which take days and days to cure depending on your climate) if you want to build up any depth otherwise it won't go clear. I thought I was doing it thinly... but it turns out I had poured nearly a cm in one go and should have split that into 2 if not 3 smaller layers.

Good luck with it all :-)


May 11th, 2018, 5:10 pm
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fibretip wrote:
I use wood glue for everything on the tiles whether it's foam, fabric, card, wood, whatever I'm attaching. The only other adhesive I use is a flexible tile grout in a tube that I use to fill gaps from my lazy knife work around the outside of the tiles.

Making a basin is really important, I didn't realise that the first time round. If you pour it blind onto the foam then bubbles of air get trapped in the foams celular structure. I didn't think much of this at the time (I wasn't very careful to cover every single surface on my first go) but over the years some huge bubbles have gradually worked their way through the water effects stuff.

It is a strange product...It never dries fully hard, you can always mark it with a fingernail. If the weather gets particularly hot it gets grumpy and weird things can happen like bubbles. I once left a game overnight and my son had put a model on the water effects stuff (this was over a year after I made the tiles). When we came down in the morning I went to pick up the model and it was completely stuck... the resulting mark left in the surface of the water when I wrenched the figure off took months to go away. I was expecting it to be hard like resin but it's more like rubber.

The other thing with Realistic Water is... do not think they are being overdramatic when they say thin layers. It really is an exercise in patience. You need to do repeated small layers (which take days and days to cure depending on your climate) if you want to build up any depth otherwise it won't go clear. I thought I was doing it thinly... but it turns out I had poured nearly a cm in one go and should have split that into 2 if not 3 smaller layers.

Good luck with it all :-)


Thank you, I appreciate advice from my inspiration. I'll see what I can do, and Ill keep you posted. Pics in hopefully the next month of completed works.


May 11th, 2018, 5:28 pm
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